Toilets, Toilettes, Potties, WC

Toilets are different from place to place and the availability changes.  In the US toilets are available pretty much wherever you go – stores, restaurants, convenience stores, states build them along the Interstate as rest areas and even port-a-potties.  Where we were in France, the availability was much different, very few places had them for the public to use and when you found them sometimes they were paperless, most were toilet seatless and the way to flush was different than we were used to.  Well Cameroon has presented new challenges.  I think there is 1 place in Yaoundé that has a public restroom and we are told you must take your own paper.  Saturday we had an orientation day trip to a pottery place about 2 hours away.  We stopped an hour into the trip to use a paid public toilet.  After you pay, women are given 1 square of toilet paper and sent to the restroom.  The toilets don’t have a flushing mechanism just a bucket with water to pour down the toilet to get rid of the waste.  No sinks, so take your own hand sanitizer.  While we were at the pottery place nature called DeAnna. She was able to experience yet another different toilet – the squatty potty.  This is a little walled room with concrete sloping towards the middle and there was a metal pot lid.  You lift the lid and find a whole to squat over.  Of course, no sinks, no paper, no frills here.  On the way back we stopped to eat at a restaurant (this experience will be another blog tomorrow), but again needing to use the toilet we found ourselves faced with another way to go.  A toilet without a flushing mechanism and a sink without running water, instead a bucket with some water to wash your hands in.  So there you have it a day full of different toilets.

Toilets are different from place to place and the availability changes.  In the US toilets are available pretty much wherever you go – stores, restaurants, convenience stores, states build them along the Interstate as rest areas and even port-a-potties.  Where we were in France, the availability was much different, very few places had them for the public to use and when you found them sometimes they were paperless, most were toilet seatless and the way to flush was different than we were used to.  Well Cameroon has presented new challenges.  I think there is 1 place in Yaoundé that has a public restroom and we are told you must take your own paper.  Saturday we had an orientation day trip to a pottery place about 2 hours away.  We stopped an hour into the trip to use a paid public toilet.  After you pay, women are given 1 square of toilet paper and sent to the restroom.  The toilets don’t have a flushing mechanism just a bucket with water to pour down the toilet to get rid of the waste.  No sinks, so take your own hand sanitizer.  While we were at the pottery place nature called DeAnna. She was able to experience yet another different toilet – the squatty potty.  This is a little walled room with concrete sloping towards the middle and there was a metal pot lid.  You lift the lid and find a whole to squat over.  Of course, no sinks, no paper, no frills here.  On the way back we stopped to eat at a restaurant (this experience will be another blog), but again needing to use the toilet we found ourselves faced with another way to go.  A toilet without a flushing mechanism and a sink without running water, instead a bucket with some water to wash your hands in.  So there you have it a day full of different toilets.

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3 Responses to Toilets, Toilettes, Potties, WC

  1. Pop-Pop says:

    Isn’t it amazing how much we take for granted? I’m thinking I would want to make sure I used the bathroom at home before heading out on an adventure. (And always take a roll of Charmin)

  2. Carolyn says:

    I think I could deal with moot-moots in my laundry, intermittent availability of electrical power and taxi cab rides with 10 other people crammed into a tiny Toyota, but the toilet situation…now that’s a bad deal.

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